People

Principal Investigator

Dr. Matthew Masapollo is the director and principal investigator of the Speech Communication Laboratory (est. 2020). He received his Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders from McGill University (under Dr. Linda Polka) and completed two postdoctoral fellowships, one in Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Science at Brown University (under Dr. James L. Morgan), and one in Speech and Hearing Science at Boston University (under Dr. Frank H. Guenther).

The primary goal of Masapollo’s research program is to develop, test, and refine a theoretical framework, termed MIPA (Motor Involvement in Phonological Acquisition), that seeks to explicate the complex relations between speech perception, speech motor control, and phonological sensitivity. His research team (see below) then applies that framework to the study of neurodevelopmental disorders involving speech and design of mechanistically driven rehabilitation protocols. Toward this end, he is working to develop optimal methods to directly examine speech motor actions in young children, using state-of-the-art electromagnetic articulography and electroglottography. Current projects are focused on exploring the scaffolding of inter-articulator speech production, speech perception, and phonologically-based language skills in children with auditory deficits (congenital hearing loss, otitis media with effusion) or articulation disorders that interfere with speech motor practice (cleft palate, stuttering). 

Matt

Masapollo CV

Main Research Interests

  • Speech motor control
  • Speech perception
  • Phonological sensitivity
  • Organization and coordination of articulatory gestures
  • Speech motor sequence learning

Funding/Awards

Training in Grantsmanship for Rehabilitation Research (TIGRR). 2022

Emerging Research Grant, Hearing Health Foundation. 2021

Research Opportunity Seed Fund Award, UF Research. 2021

New Investigators Research Grant, American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation. 2020

Contact Matt

Publications

For a full listing of Matt’s publications please see our research page.

Students and Trainees

Doctoral Students


Allen ShamsiAllen Shamsi is a doctoral student in Linguistics (PI: R. Wayland). His pre-dissertation research is quantifying the articulatory correlates of speech motor sequence learning, using electromagnetic articulography.

 

 

 

 

 

Doctor of Audiology Students


Emily BrownEmily Brown is an Au.D. student investigating whether deficits in spectral and temporal processing influence speech motor control in congenitally deaf children and adults who received cochlear implants.


DanielleDanielle Hovsepian is an Au.D. student investigating whether sensitivity to visible speech movements (i.e., silent lip-reading) facilitates speech motor control in congenitally deaf children and adults who received cochlear implants.

 

 

 

 

Master’s Students

NicholasNicholas Salazar is completing his Master’s in Computer Science. He is interested in computational linguistics, data science, and machine learning. He joined the lab to assist with programming speech production experiments using electromagnetic articulography and auditory feedback manipulations.

 

 

 

Undergraduates


J.GoelJessica Goel is an undergraduate studying Biomedical Engineering. Her honors thesis project aims to develop optimal methods for combining electromagnetic articulography and electroglottography to quantify motor coordination between laryngeal and supralaryngeal articulators during speech production. 


Grant Oberle

Grant Oberle is an undergraduate majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. His honors thesis project is examining the role of auditory feedback on speech motor control in congenitally deaf cochlear implant users and their normal hearing counterparts, using electromagnetic articulography. This work is supported by a scholarship from the University Scholars Program (UF Center for Undergraduate Research).


Kayleigh BurgeKayleigh Burge is an undergraduate majoring in Biology. Her honors thesis project is examining the role of somatosensory feedback of the tongue on speech motor control in congenitally deaf cochlear implant users and their normal hearing counterparts, using electromagnetic articulography. 


AbigailAbigail Lebedeker is an undergraduate majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her honors thesis project is examining the development of inter-articulator speech production in young children, using electromagnetic articulography. 


Ana R.Ana Rodriguez is an undergraduate majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is assisting with an electromagnetic articulography project designed to examine the spatiotemporal coordination of the jaw and tongue during speech production. 


MahmoudMahmoud Fakhouri is a pre-med undergraduate majoring in Biomedical Engineering. He is assisting with an electromagnetic articulography data acquisition and analysis. 


Lab Alumni

Jessica Smith, B.H.S., (2022), Thesis: “Organization of articulatory gestures for phonotactically legal and illegal syllable onset clusters: an electromagnetic articulography study”

Julia Ginter, B.H.S., (2022), Thesis: “Spatiotemporal orchestration among the jaw and tongue tip during VCV utterances: an electromagnetic articulography study”

Morgan Powell, B.S., (2022)

Angelise Bulit, B.A., (2021)

Emily Zezas, B.H.S., (2021), Thesis: “Specificity of speech motor sequence learning,” recipient of the 2021 Outstanding Scholar Award from the UF Alumni Association & Honors Program. 

Cassandra Chappell, B.H.S., (2021), Thesis: “Generalization as a window to speech motor sequence chunking”

Abigail Cragin, B.H.S., (2021)

Ariel Gordon, B.H.S., (2021)

Sophia Benson, B.H.S., (2021)